Linguistic anthropology and AI, part 2

I posted the original set of questions so I could shoot them over to a few people, to get their thoughts on my thoughts. Delivered even more than expected.  In the emails and conversations I’ve had since then, there are ever more questions, that I am going to keep documenting here.

  • If it were possible to allow the AIs to interrupt each other, to cut in before one finished what it was saying, what would happen?
  • What happens if you have three AIs in conversation or negotiation?
  • Are the AIs identical in the beginning? If, so, who modifies language first, and do they do it differently? In concert? In reaction?
  • Does an AI who changes language get considered a new incarnation of the AI? Does it modify itself, as it modifies its language?
  • If you have two AIs with different programming, two different incarnations, of a sort, what modifications do they make, vs two instantiations of the same thing?
  • Does language come about as a means of addressing desires and needs? [Misha wrote this and I find I don’t agree, which is really a deeply fascinating place to go with this.]
  • Can machines have desires and needs? How would we know the answer to this?
  • Is the assumption that machines modify language for reasons of efficiency overly deterministic?
  • What is the role of embodiment in the creation of language? Is it required for something to be meaningful? Does it change the way language works? Would it ‘count’ for cyborgs?

One thing I have discovered is that I go at this from a different perspective than many of my conversation partners, which is that I accept that it is possible that everything we think we know is wrong, both about humans, and about machines.  As I wrote, we assume humans are rational in order to make models of human behavior, which are faulty, because we are not. We assume machines are rational, because we programmed them to be, but what if they, too, are not? There seems to be a sense that binary does not allow for irrationality, or anomaly, but..what if it does?

I think I need to wrap into these discussions four things:

  1.  a primer on computational linguistics for those who don’t have it
  2.  a bit of an overview on general linguistics, and where we stand on that
  3.  an overview of creole linguistics, because I think it is a very interesting model to use for the evolution of AI languages, particularly and perhaps except, for the bit where it requires a power dynamic, historically.
  4. some discussion of the genetic evolution of algorithms, deep learning, adversarial networks etc.

Misha’s last really interesting question to me: “Can you evolve language without pain?” is a bit acontextual as I toss it here, but what an interesting question about feedback loops.

 

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